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Charles Mary Kubricht
Alive-Nesses: Proposal for Adaptation

September 2011 – November 2012
On the High Line at West 30th Street

Kubricht’s installation is inspired by dazzle, a type of protective design and coloration on animals designed by Abbott Thayer in America and developed into military camouflage by Norman Wilkinson in Great Britain during World War I. Dazzle camouflage was used to confuse the enemy by disguising the ships and complicating the tracking of the ship’s movement. For the High Line, the artist has painted black and white disruptive patterns on park storage containers, altering the view of these large structures from the northern end of the High Line.

Alive-nesses: Proposal for Adaptation gives Kubricht the opportunity to play with the intrinsic geometry of objects using her large black and white geometric compositions. Positioned within the elevated cityscape provided by the High Line, the artist’s treatment of the park storage containers distorts their appearance and translates the act of viewing them into a heightened visceral experience. This technique invites the viewer to move and change directions, altering familiar visual information and questioning the objects’ shape and form, as well as the viewer’s field of vision.

Photos courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Charles Mary Kubricht

Charles Mary Kubricht (b. 1946, Texas) lives and works in Texas and New York. Recent solo exhibitions include the Marfa Book Company, Marfa, Texas (2011); Moody Gallery, Houston (2010); Austin Museum of Art, Austin (2005); and the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Houston (2000). In 2010 she was awarded a GSA Art in Architecture commission for the border between the United States and Mexico, a Rice University Public Art Program commission on the Rice University campus, and a residency at Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, New York.

Support

This High Line Art Commission is presented by Friends of the High Line and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation. High Line Art Commissions are made possible by Donald R. Mullen, Jr., with additional support from Vital Projects Fund, Inc. This program is supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

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