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Laure Prouvost
In-her dreams

 

August 3 – September 27, 2017
Daily from 7 pm – 11 pm

On the High Line at 14th St.

Laure Prouvost creates sensual, poetic, and playful videos that poke fun at the seriousness of the art world. Across her work, Prouvost enlivens images as embodied characters in her videos, which can see, and even touch, the viewer. She collages together intimate close-ups of twittering birds, nude bathers, peeling fruit, or gesturing fingertips, creating the feeling that, as she says, “this image is kissing you.” Throughout these collages, her omnipresent narrator directly address the viewer, ordering the viewer to “sit there,” and “look there,” thus entwining us all in the unfolding plot.

For her High Line Channel program, Prouvost presents a selection of six works. In Finger Point Green (2011), the artist bats away a pesky tree branch in the way of her pointing “there, over there” to a nondescript patch of grass that may just stand for the act of pointing itself. In It, Hit, Heat (2010) and How To Make Money Religiously (2014), Prouvost leads the viewer on thrilling chases and adventures led by text and images flashing across the screen. Grandma’s Dream (2013) details Prouvost’s account of her grandmother’s dream reality, complete with teapot-airplanes “serving tea to everyone in the world” and a husband who makes conceptual art that “would make things useful.” In For a Better Life (2006) Prouvost serenades a row of charmingly captivated cows standing by the roadside. The artist concludes the program with a new work in her “Metal Men” series titled Monitor Head (2017).

Image: Laure Prouvost, Grandma’s Dream, 2013 (still). HD video, color, sound; 8 minutes, 55 seconds. Courtesy of the artist; Nathalie Obadia, Paris and Brussels; and carlier | gebauer, Berlin

Laure Prouvost

Laure Prouvost (b. 1978, Croix, France) lives and works in Arialmorla and Moulamnbeck in Belgium. Her practice encompasses video, sound, objects and installation.

Support

Major support for High Line Art comes from Donald R. Mullen, Jr. and The Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston. Additional funding is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. High Line Art is supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the New York City Council and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

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