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Mark Dion
A Field Guide & Handbook

$13

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Mark Dion’s work fuses the unlikely disciplines of science and art.  Incorporating elements of biology, archaeology, ethnography, and mythology, Dion’s projects examine the ways in which dominant beliefs and public institutions shape our understanding of history, knowledge and the natural world. Previous projects range from excavating ancient and modern artifacts out of the banks of the Thames to creating a marine life laboratory of specimens culled from New York’s Chinatown. With an edge of irony, humor and improvisation, his self-proclaimed “fantastic archaeology” blurs the line between artifact and artwork. The artist questions the distinction between “objective” (rational) scientific methods and “subjective” (irrational) influences, often upending our preconceptions of these categories. The job of the artist, as Dion believes, is to challenge perception and convention through subverting traditional hierarchies.

For the High Line, Dion has designed a field guide and handbook that hovers between fact and fiction, encouraging viewers to question popular ideologies that define today’s “official” history of the elevated park. The text includes “thoughts, musings, and histories,” such as a timeline of events on the High Line, a “concise” guide to the wildlife and illustrated guide to the plants of the area, “Facts, Myths, & Rumors,” and even a “Lost & Found” section. “Facts, Myths & Rumors” is particularly illustrative of Dion’s characteristic oscillation between fact and fiction. The section consists of a list of uncategorized statements; ranging from serious declarations, “the High Line once extended to Spring Street,” to more humorous musings, “the ghost of the West Side Cowboy has been seen and heard around the West 20th Street section of the park.” Dion leaves the viewer to separate truth from myth. Taken as a whole, the text encourages imagination and inquiry rather than dictates fact – asking the viewer to play a role in shaping their own version of history.

Photos Courtesy of Friends of the High Line. 

Mark Dion

Mark Dion (b. 1961, Massachusetts) lives in New York and works worldwide. He has received numerous awards, including the ninth annual Larry Aldrich Foundation Award (2001) and the Smithsonian American Art Museums Lucelia Art Award (2008). Major solo exhibitions include the Explorers Club, New York (2012); Miami Art Museum (2011 & 2006); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2004); Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut (2003); and Tate Gallery, London (1999). Dion has recently completed major commissions for dOCUMENTA 13, Kassel (2012); Oceanographic Museum, Monaco (2011); and the Seattle Art Museum, Seattle (2006). He is the co-director of Mildreds Land, an innovative visual art education and residency program in Beach Lake, Pennsylvania.

Program Partner

Printed Matter is the world’s largest non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of publications made by artists. Founded as a for-profit alternative arts space in 1976 by artists and art workers, Printed Matter reincorporated in 1978 to become the independent non-profit organization that it is today. Recognized for years as an essential voice in the increasingly diversified art world conversations and debates, Printed Matter is dedicated to the examination and interrogation of the changing role of artists’ publications in the landscape of contemporary art. Printed Matter’s mission is to foster the appreciation, dissemination, and understanding of artists’ publications, which we define as books or other editioned publications conceived by artists as art works, or, more succinctly, as “artwork for the page.”

Support

High Line Art is presented by Friends of the High Line and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation. Major support for High Line Art comes from Donald R. Mullen, Jr. and the Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston, with additional funding provided by David Zwirner Gallery and Vital Projects Fund, Inc. High Line Art is supported, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

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